10 Cosmetic Treatments You Should Not Do

All opinions expressed in this review are my own and not influenced in any way by anyone. This post contains affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase I may make a commission.

You want to look your very best!!

‘Tis the Holliday season. Dinner with friends and family, holiday parties, weddings and special dates.  You’ve bought your dress, shoes, accessories, scheduled your hair and make-up.

You look into the mirror feeling you need a little perk. I know that feeling all too well!!  I’ll wake up one morning thinking I must get some fillers, botox and a facial stat! I’ll look at my calendar and try to plan. If I’ve had a dental cleaning or any dental work, I’ll wait three weeks before any fillers. I don’t want to get a  Biofilm infection.

There is a menu of services and specials at every medical spa, dermatologist or plastic surgeon’s practice during the holidays. It’s very tempting. 

Plan!! Schedule these treatments allowing yourself the proper time for healing or any adjustments. You don’t want to look bruised, swollen or red before your event. Since I am a bruiser, I’ll  schedule my treatments 3 or 4 weeks before any event because sometimes my bruising  lasts 10 days. But, there are times I want a quick fix and this maynot be the wisest decision. If you can’t get in to see your favorite dermatologist, esthetician or injector, my advice is to schedule after your event. I wouldn’t suggest going on Instagram and choosing  a doctor you’ve never meet before. This is not the time to experiment. f you do bruise there are many makeup tips to help cover your bruising or redness. Ask your  doctor or injector about zapping the injection sites with laser. You can usually see bruises  pop out quite quickly. I always get zapped before I leave the office and sometimes have to go back a few days later.  

My favorite cover-up  is from Colorscience. It helps to cover bruising, uneven tone and redness.

Colorescience Mineral Makeup Palette, Beauty On the Go, 5 Neutralizing Makeup Shades

Schedule these treatments at least two weeks before your event

  1. Botox– you may bruise, need a tweak or develop a droopy eye which is very rare but a reality.
  2. Laser– depending on the type and depth you could be red, swollen, itchy, and peeling. One treatment may not give you the results you are seeking.
  3. Mico-needling – you may look red, and slightly swollen. This usually resolves quickly unless its a combination of laser and micro-needling.
  4. Don’t change your skincare routine or introduce new products. Start 6-8 weeks before an event on the off chance you may get a reaction.
  5. Stop any Retin-A treatments a week before you are planning a trip or event so you are not red and peeling.
  6. Lip Fillers- Swelling, bruising and soreness is very common. You may be swollen for 7 days and you really will not see the final result for two weeks. Juvederm swells more than Resytlane.
  7. Filling your eye hollows or tear throughs. This can be very tricky. Bruising and swelling is very likely. There is a chance you could be  overfilled or underfilled. Tweaking this area is common.
  8. Facial Fillers – Two to three weeks in advance. You may bruise, and have swelling. Plus if you need any adjustments you will have time. This includes Juvederm, Volumna, Restylane, Radiesse and Sculptra. Hyaluronic acid fillers (HA) like Juvederm swell. 
  9. Hand rejuvenation with fillers. Your hand will be swollen and may feel hard for several days.
  10. Looking to rid of brown spots with IPL? Chances you will need to have several treatments. Those ugly brown spots turn dark brown before they go away. 

Most importantly always consult a board certified plastic surgeon, dermatologist or a certified aesthetic nurse.

Be Beautiful Not Botched!™

Love,
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Here’s to Beautiful Skin!! Top 30 List

Looking for the best anti-aging skin care products?

I first wrote this post in 2009- 10 year ago.  As we approach the holidays and winter, I thought this is a perfect time to update my list and add some cautionary tips.

Since buying skincare products is very confusing let’s first look at how to read skincare product labels to ensure that you are buying effectively.

  1. Read to to the end. The first 5 ingredients are the bulk of the formula. However low-levels can also be effective, but don’t expect much
  2. Watch out for alcohol listed as one of the first three ingredients – buy another product
  3. Some of the ingredients have long names which refer to their chemical structure
  4. Most brands add additional ingredients for the uniqueness of the brand, that does not mean it is more or less effective

Look for these ingredients when buying anti-aging skin care products. You can find many of these ingredients on your dermatologist and plastic surgeon’s shelf.

You can also find many of these ingredients in OTC products sold in Sephora or on websites like The Dermstore.

Keep in mind that many OTC products have some of these ingredients- however strengths differ.  Professional skincare products sold through aesthetic practices usually contain higher strengths of some of these ingredients especially Retinol.

Look for clinical trials

Here’s is my updated list of 30 good healthy skin ingredients. 

  1. Retinol- Vitamin A and Tretinoin (prescription)  best anti-aging ingredient
    Also available Retinol in none-prescription strength
  2. Vitamin C ester- the most stable form of Vitamin C Anti-oxidant
  3. Cerimides- seal in moisture
  4. Collagen- benefits your hair, skin and nails
  5. L-Ascorbic Acid, Tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate – also Vitamin C
  6. Tacapherol and Tootrienol AKA Vitamin E- helps fight wrinkles and fines lines
  7. Alpha lipoic acid-superior anti-oxidant reduces the sign of aging
  8. Ferulic acid- antioxidant and anti-aging
  9. Hyaluronic acid-hydration. It holds up to 1,000 times its weight in water
  10. Vitamin K- helps with dark circles under the eyes
  11. Squalane- hydration
  12. Jojoba oil- rich in Vitamin E, zinc and B-vitamins
  13. Vitamin F– linoleum acid – Omega rich for heath  looking skin
  14. Kojic Acid-brightens and is an anti-oxidant
  15. Niacinimide– brightening and hydrating
  16. Mandelic Acid– exfoliating sensitive skin
  17. Marula Oil– good for dry skin, anti-microbial
  18. Lactic Acid-caution it can be drying
  19. Coenzyme -Q-10– powerfull anti-oxidant and boosts collagen
  20. Kinetin- reduces signs of aging and uneven pigment
  21. Glycolic and other alpha and beta hydroxy acids-powerful exfoliants to boost collagen and elastin
  22. Argirelene, GHK, and cooper peptides-antibacterial and anti-anti-infammatory
  23. DMAE– this ingredient is banned in Canada- anti-aging and fine lines
  24. Idebenone, thiotaine and other anti-oxidants- improves fine lines and wrinkles and prevents cell damage
  25. Peptides- are short chains of amino acids that are building blocks of proteins for texture, strength and resilience
  26. Green Tea– anti-aging
  27. Resveratrol- powerful anti-oxidant
  28. Waglerin-1 a peptide found in Temple Viper- helps fight against sagging
  29. Growth Factors- help to maintain height skin structure and function
  30. Plant Stem Cells-help to renew your skin

Skinceuticals Hydrating B5 Gel, 1.12 Oz  Skinceuticals Retinol 1 Maximum Strength Refining Night Cream, 1 Fluid Ounce  SkinCeuticals Ce Ferulic Bottle, 1 oz.

And watch out for product containing Parabens, Sulfates, Artificial Dyes, and  too many acids with vitamin C.

To Beautiful Skin!!!

Disclaimer: All opinions expressed in this review are my own and not influenced in any way by anyone. This post contains affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase I may make a commission.

 

Love,
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Leef Organics on Beauty Independent

Are CBD Skincare Products Worth It?

All opinions expressed in this review are my own and not influenced in any way by anyone. This post contains affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase I may make a commission. I do not accept money in exchange for positive reviews or a quick feature.

CBD (short for cannabidiol) infused skincare products are making a huge splash in the Beauty Industry. CBD beauty  products are targeting aging, stressed, inflamed and damaged skin. It’s no surprise given the many medicinal qualities of CBD and the changes in the 2018 Farm Bill  which legalized Hemp. 

Being a beauty industry insider for over 25 years, I’ve seen many consumers sucked into the marketing hype  of anti-aging products promising to reverse the signs of aging and damaged skin. Many of the ads and claims sound so convincing.  As a consumer, making informed decisions is difficult  if you don’t understand the efficacy of the listed ingredients and/or the science behind the products. Even with industry knowledge it’s easy to get sucked into the hype.

Now CBD, the non- psychoactive part of the marijuana plant, is a big buzz word in the beauty industry. Hemp derived CBD beauty products and other Hemp products are available online, in stores like Sephora and in your local drug or health food store. According to the Washington Post, more than 1,000 CBD-infused products (hemp) are now available online.

Hemp oil and CBD oil are legal all across the U.S when sold as a dietary supplement. Hemp derived CBD is legal in all 50 states, ‘marijuana’-derived CBD is not legal federally. The government classifies hemp as any plant of the cannabis family that contains less than 0.3% THC.

Not all CBD is the same? Before you run to your local health or beauty store for a CBD product let’s look at the differences between CBD oil and Hemp oil.

Hemp is made from the seeds of the cannabis plant while CBD is derived from the leaves of the cannabis plant. Hemp-derived CBD contains very little or no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the psychoactive part of the plant.  Hemp CBD is sometimes referred to as cannabis sativa seed oil. Think of hemp seeds as cold pressed extract from seeds, similar to sunflower oil and grapeseed oil. There are hemp advocates that claim that hemp derived CBD is just as effective as CBD derived from cannabis flower.  However, much of what we currently know is anecdotal.

It is important to note that products containing more than 0.3% THC are only sold in cannabis dispensaries in states where medical and recreational are legal. CBD products sold in dispensaries have greater amounts of THC. I recently visited a local  cannabis dispensary in San Francisco where I found CBD  and THC skincare products including bath balms, soaps, oils for vaginal health, anti-aging beauty products and pain -relief topical creams. Prices range from $37.00 to over $100.00.

What is the benefit of more THC in topical skincare products?

There are studies and hard evidence showing that CBD and THC can reduce inflammation and pain when applied topically.  But there is really no clear science at this time about the benefits of CBD and THC in beauty skincare products, though many consider them solid sources of antioxidants and beneficial amino acids. “In one commonly cited study published in the Journal of Dermatological Science in 2007, researchers isolated THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids from cannabis. They found that when applied to human skin cells, all the cannabinoids they tested inhibited the overproduction of keratinocytes (skin cells) that are commonly seen in psoriasis.”

Topicals for pain relief have shown to be more effective with higher percentages of THC. One such product is  Sweet Relief Comfort+ with THC ratios as high as 14:1.  All without the high.

Sweet Releaf 14:1 THC:CBD
Pain Relief Topical

 

Currently studies are very limited, we are only beginning to understand the many benefits of CBD and THC.

There are many key ingredients in beauty products that have proven science to back up their claims: Anti-oxidants, Retinol, Glycolic acid, Hyaluronic acid, Niacinamide, Vitamin E, Alpha-hydroxy acids, Vitamin C and many others. It is also important to note the delivery system of these products and the many other inactive ingredients which may be present in the formulation.

Now, we’re adding CBD to the list.

What does this mean for consumers?

As with any product it’s important to know the difference between the marketing hype and product claims backed by scientific studies. This is especially important when it comes to the efficacy of skincare products. Studies are very expensive and therefore many new CBD or Hemp derived skin care companies do not have the funding for scientific studies.

This is what we do know about CBD:

CBD is a powerful antioxidant especially when combined with a small amount of THC, it has many anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal and anti-oxidant properties. CBD is used to treat pain, muscle aches, anxiety, arthritis, gut disorders, skin diseases and more. However, much of the current research is still antidotal. Most beauty products containing CBD are made with industrial hemp seed oil which differs from skincare products or topicals made with CBD oil and THC. If you see a CBD skincare product at your local drug store it is Hemp vs the skincare products on the shelves of a legal cannabis dispensary.

This is what we currently know about Hemp seed oil:

Hemp seeds contain lots of essential fatty acids that may help alleviate dry skin, eczema, and other skin irritations. It has anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties. Another benefit is omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids within hemp seeds are still present when they are cold pressed into hemp seed oil. Hemp seed oil is hydrating and contain fatty acids therefore it’s a great moisturizer for the skin.

 

 

The bottom line: There are many new CBD Hemp Oil beauty products to try, including lip balms, bath salts, mascara, soaps, night cream, body lotions, hair products and many more.  Do your research, talk to your dermatologist to make sure you are buying the right products for your skin type and buy from brands you trust.

LeefOrganics.com

I predict CBD skincare products will become a popular choice as more studies reveal CBD’s benefits to the health of our skin. Stay tuned for CBD product reviews.

 

 

Follow me on IG @niptuckcoach and @cannabiztalk

 

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