eye hollows

Filling Eye Hollows with Dermal Fillers: What Are The Risks?

Cosmetic injection in the spa salon
Deep hollows under your eyes can make you look tired and dull.  This can be corrected with fillers.

Filling eye hollows is a delicate business and there are risks. The biggest risk is bruising, lumps and swelling. In some cases if not done properly it can actually make your lower eye area look worse.  Today there are more hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers in the aesthetic tool box and techniques for treating this delicate area have improved.

I’ve been reading many online posts from patients who have had both fillers and have experienced puffiness, lumps, and a baggy look after the injection. Others have had good results. I’ve seen good and bad results. Please choose your injector wisely. This is a very difficult area to treat.

Performing “tear trough” treatments to the hollow area under the eyes requires meticulous technique and can be a very satisfying treatment when done correctly.

Below are some guidelines to consider before you jump into filling your eye hollows (tear trough).

Parts of this post was originally written in 20o9 when I had my tear troughs treated for the first time.

A business colleague had her tear trough area filled by a local plastic surgeon in San Francisco, CA .  I was very impressed with her results and decided to fill my eye hollows, for a more youthful look.  At the time there were only two HA fillers on the market Juvederm and Restylane. Although both fillers were very similar Juvederm tends to create more puffiness in the eye area than Restylane, as it absorbs more water. My surgeon choose Juvederm which surprised me because Restylane was the preferred filler for this area. However, I trusted his judgement.

Afterwards I very bruised, swollen and lumpy. I waited patiently a couple of weeks hoping it would resolve. The bruising diminished but the puffiness persisted. I looked like I had been punched in the face and knew that I had to have a correction. Fortunately HA fillers can easily be dissolved with hyaluronidase. (more…)

Filling Hollow Eyes Part 2: What are the risks?

In 2011, I wrote a blog about Filling Your Eye Hollows with dermal filler; my experience and the risks.

I thought it was time to update this post, since so many of my readers have sent me questions  over the years.

I first had Juvederm injected in my eye hollows causing lumps, bumps, swelling and much bruising. The Juvederm was dissolved with Filling Eye HollowsWydaise and replaced with Restylane which worked beautifully.  The Restylane lasted  around 12 months in my tear trough area.   Note that the duration of fillers will differ from one patient to the next.

Filling Hollow Eyes- What’s new?

JUVÉDERM VOLUMA™ XC

Since the FDA approval this year of  Allergan’s  JUVÉDERM VOLUMA™ XC  there is shift  in the philosophy among some dermatologists and plastic surgeons about how to treat the tear trough area.

Volumna is the latest FDA approved filler product in the family of HYALURONIC ACID. What’s new and exciting about this filler is that is it lasts up to 24 months  it can be dissolved if necessary.  Volumna gives you instant volume to the cheek area, therefore in some cases eliminating the need to fill the eye hollows. By injecting Volumna is the upper cheek area, the doctor can place it close to the bony orbital rim that is usually volume depleted in hollow eyes. This is great option because it lasts for up  to 24 months and not only are you plumping and lifting your cheeks, but it may eliminate the hollow area under eyes as well.

Volumna costs more than a one syringe of Juvederm, however over the long-term it ends being less expensive due to its longevity. A syringe of Volumna costs on an average of $1,000 per syringe as compared to $625 for one syringe of Juvederm or Restylane.

Restylane is still used for filling the tear troughs and works better for this area than Juvederm Ultra– not to be confused with Volumna. (more…)